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avabob

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Reply with quote  #16 
I am not sure any higher percentage of junior bowlers graduated to adult leagues in the 60s.  Just a lot bigger base of juniors to apply the 20% to.  Also, their were a lot of adults of all ages who were beginners themselves in the early 60's.  I started bowling in 1960 when a Brunswick house went into our small town.  The place had double shift leagues 6 days a week, with a couple of day leagues.  Virtually everyone was a beginner regardless of age.  My parents started at age 50. 

By any definition  league bowling boomed in the 60's.  Booms of that magnitude are not sustainable.    Overall number of bowlers has not dropped too much, just league participation.   
Fordman

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Reply with quote  #17 
What exactly is a youth bowler or a junior bowler?  I am talking about kids 10 thru 15 for junior bowlers.  Once they are old enough to shave bowl in HS. 
Bowlers are people who belong to leagues or bowl in tournaments.
The others are people who go bowling.

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Buckeye_Nut

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Reply with quote  #18 
ya gotta' go with "Youth" by definition.  Any bowler under the age of 21 that plans to bowl competitively must stick to youth bowling leagues/competitions.   No adult league or competition is allowed or they lose eligibility.  I'm going through this now with Colby.  
mystrsyko

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Reply with quote  #19 
At least in my area, if a bowler under the age of 21 earns any kind of money from bowling that is not specifically scholorship money, they are no longer considered a youth bowler and no longer allowed in youth competition. All the kids you see taking on the pba or junior gold have to have any money earned put aside in their USBC Smart account as scholorship money.

As far as high school bowling goes, I see it as the future of youth bowling. Rather than kids being introduced through leagues, they'll get their start on school teams, and hopefully join leaguesafter that. At least, that's who bowling centers should be targeting with their league promotions.

To answer the original question of where all the league bowlers went, same place the millions of "used to play football in high school" people went. They just stopped competing.
Fordman

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Reply with quote  #20 
mystro you had me until you compared football to bowling?
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mystrsyko

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Reply with quote  #21 
Well, think about how many millions of people played football in high school and took it extremely seriously, and then just stopped playing, either cause they weren't picked up in college, or were injured or whatever. They still love the sport, but they don't compete anymore so they don't bother looking for local leagues. Bowling is in a similar situation. All the league bowlers of days gone by decided to stop competing for one reason or another. They still love the sport, but have chosen not to be active in it any longer. The challenge for leagues and bowling centers is to convince them that it's worth competing again, or worth continueing to compete.
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