Bowling Forums, Bowling Discussion and Bowling Talk
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 3      1   2   3   Next
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #1 
Later today USBC will announce the elimination of balance holes by 2020. If you purchased a ball recently and have a balance in it, sorry. Kiss your $250 goodbye. Thanks, Chad! 

Great Stuff will now standard equipment in pro shops soon. Fill the hole & plug it off. 
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #2 
Also only dry towels can be used to wipe off bowling balls. Not sure if that eliminates those micro fiber pads I've been seeing a lot lately.
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #3 
ARLINGTON, Texas – Following three years of research on how technology has affected the sport of bowling, the United States Bowling Congress Equipment and Specifications Committee has established new specifications designed to sustain the playing field both currently and in the future.

The new specifications, which will be implemented over the course of the next two seasons, were announced at the USBC Convention in Reno, Nevada.
 
“Technology impacts every sport, but it is our role as the National Governing Body to ensure the skill of the competitors on the lanes remains the deciding factor,” said Andrew Cain, chair of the USBC Equipment and Specifications Committee. “The research presented revealed the impact technology has made on the sport’s playing environment and the committee determined there was a need to enact these specifications.”

A new specification has been established for the oil absorption rate of bowling ball coverstocks, the first time such a specification has been set, and a specification to eliminate balance holes while increasing static weight allowances also has been approved.

In addition, new rules will be put into place to allow only a dry towel to be used to clean bowling balls during competition and to keep bowlers from changing the static weight (i.e. drilling grip holes deeper) of bowling balls during competition.

“The diligent work of the USBC Equipment Specifications and Certifications team spurred discussions in several areas and the committee made decisions that are needed to protect our sport’s future,” USBC President Frank Wilkinson said. “Technology will continue to push the boundaries and we will continue to analyze every aspect to make certain we are doing what’s in the best interests of bowling and our members.”

The new oil absorption specification for bowling ball coverstocks will require that for a new ball to be approved, submitted ball samples cannot have a rate of oil absorption under 2 minutes and 15 seconds (2:15), and must adhere to the 0.6% non-conformance rate. 

The initial step on the oil absorption specification will begin Aug. 1, 2018, when bowling ball manufacturers are required to submit oil absorption data as part of the USBC bowling ball approval process. Manufacturers have been provided a standard operating procedure (SOP) to determine oil absorption rates.

The specification requiring a bowling ball’s oil absorption rate to be more than 2:15 for the ball to be approved will take effect Aug. 1, 2020. Also, any ball models tested where the average oil absorption rate is under nine minutes and 30 seconds (9:30) will require additional balls to be tested.

The specification eliminating the use of balance holes will go into effect Aug. 1, 2020. Balance holes, also known as weight holes, are meant to correct static imbalance in bowling balls, but more recently have been used to change the design intent of balls. By allowing bowling balls (for balls weighing more than 10 pounds) to have up to three ounces of static side, thumb and finger weight – which is up from one ounce – and up to three ounces of top weight, there no longer will be the need for a balance hole to correct static imbalance in the typical ball layout.

The specification increases in static weights take effect Jan. 1, 2020, which will allow bowlers the opportunity to plug balance holes prior to the elimination of balance holes starting Aug. 1, 2020.  

With the elimination of balance holes, bowlers may have up to five holes for gripping purposes and all gripping holes must be used on every delivery.

The change allowing only a dry towel to clean bowling balls during competition becomes effective Aug. 1, 2019. It eliminates the use of liquid cleaners of any kind during competition, which aligns with other changes to ensure equipment is not manipulated during competition. The change prohibiting a bowler from adjusting static weight during a competition by drilling grip holes deeper goes into effect Aug. 1, 2020.

It is important for bowlers to understand the specification for oil absorption will not eliminate any bowling balls from competition, as all current balls will be grandfathered in. Bowlers also should be aware that because the increase in static weights starts Jan. 1, 2020, they will have seven months to have any balance hole plugged so they will be in compliance when the specification eliminating balance holes starts Aug. 1, 2020.

The Equipment and Specifications Committee has delegated authority from the USBC Board to make changes to equipment specifications. The USBC Board fully supports the direction and action taken by the Equipment Specifications Committee.

USBC will conduct a media-only teleconference on Tuesday, April, 24 at 8 p.m. (Eastern) with Equipment Specifications Committee members and USBC staff. To participate in the conference call, media members can email terry.bigham@bowl.com with their name and affiliation for call-in instructions.
themrfreeze

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 3,772
Reply with quote  #4 
So they grandfathered in balls for the oil absorption thing but not for the balance holes?  Another absolute travesty perpetrated by the USBC.  I have several balls with balance holes that were needed to bring them...surprisingly...INTO balance, including several of my original used Faball Hammers that were drilled this way to keep the old plugs out of my track area.  Completely and totally legal at the time.  Now I can't use them after 2020 unless I spend a few hundred dollars to have the balls completely plugged and redrilled, further eroding their original coverstock?  I just as soon never bowl in another sanctioned USBC event than to give up those gems!

Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #5 
Exactly. I pulled an old Triton Elite out of the closet after struggling for three weeks. I averaged 235 for the last 7 weeks with it. It has a weight hole for the same reason. The make it legal! When the time comes I'll be either filling 90% of the hole with Great Stuff or Styrofoam and plugging over the top of that. 
Fordman

Registered:
Posts: 3,649
Reply with quote  #6 
I have never owned a ball with a weight hole.  I have the pro shop person weigh it before drilling and if will require a weight hole I make them get another ball. 
__________________
Shake a Vets hand you owe them.
Dearborn Mi. Home town of Henry Ford
BackwardsPro

Registered:
Posts: 54
Reply with quote  #7 
I have around 20-25 balls in the basement right now.  Without looking, I would say all but a couple have a weight hole.  This is sillyness.
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #8 
I get what they're trying to do. Just don't agree with how they are doing it. One league I bowl in is a mixed league. I won a ball raffle earlier this past season and gave the ball to one of the girls on my team. She's a 120 bowler that throws a full roller. My pro shop guy drilled a full roller layout with a weight hole. Now we have to get it plugged which is crap. It will not affect her one bit, but now she gets to have a nice, ugly plug spot on her new ball. 

Leave it up the league and tournaments. If it's a lower average league, let it go. It really doesn't apply to them anyway. 
themrfreeze

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 3,772
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pullmyfinger
When the time comes I'll be either filling 90% of the hole with Great Stuff or Styrofoam and plugging over the top of that. 


That's actually a great idea...I'm sure the rule will be poorly written as to not specify what the hole has to be plugged with.  A super light-weight filler material with a relatively thin plug on top would satisfy the rule without totally throwing off the weight balance.

Better yet, slightly taper the weight hole then install a tapered plug.  That way you don't even need to fill in the rest of the hole.


Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #10 
You can even drill the hole a tad deeper or larger to make up for the extra plug on top. 
Oldbowler

Registered:
Posts: 290
Reply with quote  #11 
As one not real savvy on ball drilling and such and having read the ruling as it was pasted above, I think I see a glitch here. If the purpose of the balance hole is to correct for static imbalance according to the current guidelines, and they are changing the guidelines to allow for more static imbalance in a newly drilled ball, what difference does it make to your typical casual bowler?

The way it reads to me is that they want to catch the cheaters who will do anything to win.  What is that, maybe 2% of all bowlers?  I predict that even more casual leagues will drop out over foolishness like this.  Most of us have a balance hole only because the pro shop said we needed it, not because we know why or care.

For the bowler under 200 (which includes me) what identifiable difference does the hole make in the roll of the ball?  Most of the people I bowl with don't even watch the ball roll anyway let alone know what difference it makes.  Apply the new rule to pros, high average leagues, and sanctioned tournaments and leave the rest of us alone.

__________________
Old bowlers never die, they just fade away.
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,677
Reply with quote  #12 
I agree. One of the best balls I had back in the urethane days was an Ebonite Firebolt that was plugged and re-drilled about 4 or 5 times so plugging a ball doesn't necessarily hurt it. I feel bad for the guy or girl that buys a new ball maybe every 5 to 10 years or longer and telling them they have to plug it now. You shouldn't be forced to do it.

How about forcing the ball companies to start changing the serial numbers starting now and anything made from this point on cannot have an extra hole? Something easily identifiable. Anything made before and anything already in the bowlers hands is grandfathered in. I know that can get tricky with balls that will overlap the time frame, but there's got to be a better way. Maybe work with the ball companies and try to coincide the change when current ball runs end. 
SpinBowler300

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 808
Reply with quote  #13 
You have 2 complete bowling seasons to either get new equipment or have your ball plugged. You can use a balance hole ball until August 1, 2020. So that means you can use your current balls in the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 seasons.

This will not effect scoring as most houses will simply modify their house shots to bring scoring up to its current levels.


__________________
Fall Leagues: Monday - Five Star Lanes, Tuesday  & Thursday - Astro Lanes.
Balls: Motiv Golden Jackal, Motiv Trident Abyss, Motiv Hydra & Motiv Hyper Sniper. All made in the USA.

Fordman

Registered:
Posts: 3,649
Reply with quote  #14 
Lets have an expert explain why the holes are in the ball in the 1st place.  Are the balls not made correctly or can't the pro shop drill it correctly?
__________________
Shake a Vets hand you owe them.
Dearborn Mi. Home town of Henry Ford
Oldbowler

Registered:
Posts: 290
Reply with quote  #15 
I do understand why some drillings require a balance hole, but only because I have spent many hours studying all aspects of the game since I started bowling again in summer 2014. What I don't get is why eliminate them when the ball will fall within the looser guidelines with the existing hole.

To me that is like having police letting people off with ignoring the speed limit and then raising the posted limit so fewer people are speeding. Catch the violaters, not change the rules.

__________________
Old bowlers never die, they just fade away.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.