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Beeswaxhead

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Reply with quote  #61 
Dare lol lmao, if that center had have been in New York, PA or Ohio, it wouldn’t have gotten sanctioned. That’s bs that a center would neglect the proper care of their lanes like that. That’s total negligence and ignorance. There’s a loser by the name of Gary Duran on the West Coast. He’s a hell of a bowler but, as a person he’s an idiot. One time he drove a car 100,000 miles and hadn’t changed the oil. When the car broke down, he got upset. That’s totally retarded and pathetic. He was just putting fresh oil in every so often but, never changing what was in there. That’s no different than a GM or owner of a center not taking care of the lanes!
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Patrick J Yarns
Beeswaxhead

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Reply with quote  #62 
Too many owners of centers way back when even nowadays, decided that they don’t want the center anymore and rather than maintaining the lanes/center like they should, they let the lanes go without proper up keep and their customers balls get messed up because of the lack of care of the lanes. That’s bs and not fair to the customers. What’s even worse, they go to try and sell the center to someone, with lanes in horrible shape. TOTAL LOSERS THAT LET THIS HAPPEN TO A CENTER!
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Patrick J Yarns
Pullmyfinger

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Reply with quote  #63 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowling300


Urethane + short oil!


Short oil was actually as way to combat the urethane. Bowlers were in an uproar and ball companies were smart. The had the short oil balls and pearls ready to go in short time. By trying to combat it, they made it worse. The whole thing was a disaster on all levels. 
avabob

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Reply with quote  #64 
Exactly. Oil pushed around on urethane instead of tracking like it did on lacquer. Lane men were stripping constantly to combat the carrydown. The problem was that it was self defeating, and only worked if the short oil was blocked. That is what led to the wet dry cliff patterns that have become the norm for house shots over the years.
Bob_DeDowney

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Reply with quote  #65 

P.J.

I wasn’t saying you made stuff up , I’ve always been respectful of what you say , (now and years past on the PBA board) and we’ve had a few friendly conversations in person, over the years at Action Lanes , ABTA, ABT , venues and sweepers etc, around SoCal.

If you say something that seems different than what I’ve heard I just wonder where you might have hear\d that.

I have always thought my sources were pretty reliable. A few proprietors you might know,

DJ at Keystone,and his lane guys (maintenance and resurfacing) that were Hoernke protégées , Ron Gaudern at Columbia , his Western Columbia staff, and his buddy – Bill Taylor. Lots of knowledge in that group. A finger on the pulse of the game.

I have known Roy Hoernke since 1963, Roy worked for Ned Day in Wisconsin before coming west. He took missy’s dad and me to Hollywood Park for our first ever trip to the race track.

Haven’t heard anything about him since Mission Bowl. Anybody heard anything?

About the proprietor in Downey I would advise to never believe a word, but his Head Mechanic is a Genius on ALL things Bowling.

+ A few other Owners and lanemen you wouldn’t know. Some old timers that could score with no help from easy oil and easy pins.

I have been very lucky to have known some of these knowledgeable people and have had many bowling conversations with others.\

I don’t know how to lay out the newest ball except to read the info sheet that comes with the ball .

 On Bo Burton :

He has said some outlandish things over the years (1975 -1997) maybe you missed them .

His tips and bowler style analysis was ok but it seemed that he must have been instructed by the PBA to always make the bowlers look good with a false sense of infallibility , He always had some irrational explanation when a Bowler missed. It was like no one on the show ever threw a bad shot on TV for 17 years.

Did you know the # 1 board on a (wood?) lane is a little higher than #2 board so that your ball will bounce off it and ricochet back to the pocket, That’s Bo,

He could not mention that the first 5 boards were so dry and the ball would hook from the edge before it could fall into the gutter,.

That still happens today so I guess there must be ripples in the formica on the edges.

I liked Durbin / Schreiner on ESPN they told the truth about what happened on a bowler’s shot but after a couple seasons it seemed they may have been told to convert to the Burton style


themrfreeze

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Reply with quote  #66 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob_DeDowney

Did you know the # 1 board on a (wood?) lane is a little higher than #2 board so that your ball will bounce off it and ricochet back to the pocket, That’s Bo,




But it's true...the #1 board on both sides is hard maple all the way down the lane but the rest are soft pine for ~2/3rds of the lane, so as the lane is repeatedly sanded down the #1 board does sit very slightly proud.  If you throw a ball slow enough and at a shallow enough angle to the gutter, it can turn back towards the pocket.  I've seen it happen in junior leagues at the center I bowl at (80-year old wood lanes). 
avabob

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Reply with quote  #67 
Also, back on the early days of the bowling boom circa 1960, AMF and Brunswick crews did most of the resurfacing. Their machines both were set to put slight depressions ( within legal tolerances ) in the lane. Brunswick machines built the track closer to 3rd arrow, AMF closer to second arrow.
Bob_DeDowney

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Reply with quote  #68 
Avabob, that could explain why our coach said to play AMF lanes a bit wider than Brunswick lanes.

Glenn Allison explained how the “fall back” Condition was created by some of the maintenance and resurface crews. He said when a lane is in need of a resurface the wear is in the center and has a dish shaped effect at or near 15 to 15 or 12 to 12 ?.
They don’t cut the lane completely flat but leave some of that dish there. And that creates a small area to play and surprisingly some good carry but it requires a tighter line and is pretty much exclusive for righthanders. This was a common condition pre-1960 and can explain the lack of lefties in the elite class.

Those few lefties that rose to the highest levels are very special in my regard. Local SoCal bowler Billy Myers stands out in that category as does a few early PBA lefties Jerry McCoy and Roy Lown.

Roy Hoernke cut his lanes like that and added some extra effects by additional coatings of finish in just the right places..
Bob_DeDowney

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Reply with quote  #69 
MrFreeze, can't dispute that because I was told by a lane guy that it could happen when circular sanders
were used.

But... Guys like Ballard, Amletto, "Coast to Coast" Lawrence etal threw harder than 1-2 mph.

Also the tour occasionally bowled on all maple lanes?.
avabob

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Reply with quote  #70 
Fall back shot was available very commonly, especially in Brunswick houses, all during during tbe lacquer era of the 50s and 60s. I won my first scratch tournament in 1966 playing fall back between 17 and 20 during the finals. Interestingly I have occasionally seen shots play like fall back on some of real long sport patterns. My last 300 a couple of years ago was on a 47 foot pattern where I had a fall back look on second shift of qualifying
Bob_DeDowney

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Reply with quote  #71 
Avabob ,
Didn't you come to Socal for a West Coast Senior event maybe the late 90's ? Orange County , maybe Garden Grove? I think I saw you bowl there.
Beeswaxhead

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Reply with quote  #72 
Avabob the fallback shot is definitely a true test of ability, because a lot of bowlers or so-called bowlers, aren’t comfortable with playing deep inside. I got used to that shot when I bowled juniors in the late 70s in Western New York. From time-to-time, on wood lanes it would be a certain shot out there to where you play 20-17 board and do a partial swing out to about the 10 board then simply let it fall back. I played more straight but, I would play that shot every now and then. I’ve won a few scratch tournaments playing the fallback line. I love it!
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Patrick J Yarns
Beeswaxhead

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Reply with quote  #73 
Bob I will agree with you on what said about Billy Myers Jr. & Sr, as well as the other 2 guys you mentioned. They did become great bowlers and rise to the occasion. I know Billy Jr. personally, he now owns Bowlium the center in Montclair, Cal.
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Patrick J Yarns
avabob

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Reply with quote  #74 
Never bowled in Cal. I bowled the Masters every year from 95 thru 2000. Bowled a couple of Senior Masters in Reno and Tucson. Never been PBA member
Bob_DeDowney

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Reply with quote  #75 
Quote:
Originally Posted by avabob
Never bowled in Cal. I bowled the Masters every year from 95 thru 2000. Bowled a couple of Senior Masters in Reno and Tucson. Never been PBA member

I guess it was another Bob from Washington , what are the chances?.
I'll try again, I might have seen you at a Senior event in Vegas, maybe the senior masters at Sun Coast early 2000's ?
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