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Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #1 
I think for me personally the biggest unknown, and the scariest part of it, is how many people are out running around with it, and don't know it. I've read that at least 25% of those who tested positive show no symptoms, and thus are carriers. so how do we ever get back to social gatherings like bowling with that reality?  I am typically pretty decisive about things but this one has me flumoxed, as my dear departed mother used to say.


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mrbowling300

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yes, I would agree that this is the most concerning thing about this disease, those who are asymptomatic.   This is why testing is so very important, for society to start to function again.
TCJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
If what they are saying is true about when COVID was actually here in the U.S. and if it's true that it's as contagious as they now think, then a huge share of the population has already been exposed and either had it with mild symptoms or fought it off successfully with no symptoms.  Assuming that the human body can build immunity to it, I think we are well on our way to herd immunity.  Will COVID mutate?  Probably.  But we'll still have some immunity to it and it won't come back as strong as it is (which is arguable in itself).   

What could really help is to open things back up with reasonable precautions since the curve has already spread out and hospitals have had a chance to prepare (which is the reason for the lockdown).  With people associating with each other again (and again with reasonable precautions) more immunity will be built up.  Will more people get it?  Yes, but experts have already said the lockdown won't prevent people from getting COVID, but it will just spread it out over time.  We already did that!  By the time any vaccine is made, just about everyone will have been exposed to it and either fought it off (most people) or died.  Vaccine will only be a guess because odds are the virus will mutate over time and they'll be using the same method they do for the flu vaccine which is questionably effective. 

What is clear is that subjecting oneself to worry about an unknown situation is only going to be detrimental to one's mental and physical well-being.  I know it's easier said than done, but it's necessary for people to focus on what they can do rather than can't.

As for me, I will go about business as normal as soon as I can.  I am already 99% positive I was exposed to the virus back in February when a friend of mine had an awful "flu" for about two weeks and he was around me several times.  I'm sure I've been exposed many times since then.  Odds are I have build up some immunity to it and I won't have a problem catching it.  But if I do? Well, that's part of life.  You always take a gamble just by living.

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Highs: Series (Sanc.): 794 | Game (Sanc.): 290/257 (LH) | Game (Unsanc.): 300 | Game Sport: 263 Averages: High (RH): 211 | High (LH): 175 | Sport: 166 (56) | Shark(8): 149 | Scorpion(8): 184 | Chameleon(12): 170 | Viper(12): 169 | Cheetah(12): 160 | US Open(3): 175 ___________________________
Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCJ
If what they are saying is true about when COVID was actually here in the U.S. and if it's true that it's as contagious as they now think, then a huge share of the population has already been exposed and either had it with mild symptoms or fought it off successfully with no symptoms.  Assuming that the human body can build immunity to it, I think we are well on our way to herd immunity.  Will COVID mutate?  Probably.  But we'll still have some immunity to it and it won't come back as strong as it is (which is arguable in itself).   

What could really help is to open things back up with reasonable precautions since the curve has already spread out and hospitals have had a chance to prepare (which is the reason for the lockdown).  With people associating with each other again (and again with reasonable precautions) more immunity will be built up.  Will more people get it?  Yes, but experts have already said the lockdown won't prevent people from getting COVID, but it will just spread it out over time.  We already did that!  By the time any vaccine is made, just about everyone will have been exposed to it and either fought it off (most people) or died.  Vaccine will only be a guess because odds are the virus will mutate over time and they'll be using the same method they do for the flu vaccine which is questionably effective. 

What is clear is that subjecting oneself to worry about an unknown situation is only going to be detrimental to one's mental and physical well-being.  I know it's easier said than done, but it's necessary for people to focus on what they can do rather than can't.

As for me, I will go about business as normal as soon as I can.  I am already 99% positive I was exposed to the virus back in February when a friend of mine had an awful "flu" for about two weeks and he was around me several times.  I'm sure I've been exposed many times since then.  Odds are I have build up some immunity to it and I won't have a problem catching it.  But if I do? Well, that's part of life.  You always take a gamble just by living.


When I used to go out on patrol in Viet Nam, there was always one guy with your attitude.  He typically believed if a bullet had his name on it, it was his time.  I'm still alive and he is not.  I don't believe in stepping in front of a bullet.  When I have some assurance it's realistically safe out there, I'll cautiously enter the fray.  Until then, I'll play if safe at home.

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TCJ

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Reply with quote  #5 
Except my "attitude" isn't risky. I already explained plenty of reasons. Your analogy to Vietnam isn't a good one.
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Highs: Series (Sanc.): 794 | Game (Sanc.): 290/257 (LH) | Game (Unsanc.): 300 | Game Sport: 263 Averages: High (RH): 211 | High (LH): 175 | Sport: 166 (56) | Shark(8): 149 | Scorpion(8): 184 | Chameleon(12): 170 | Viper(12): 169 | Cheetah(12): 160 | US Open(3): 175 ___________________________
Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCJ
Except my "attitude" isn't risky. I already explained plenty of reasons. Your analogy to Vietnam isn't a good one.


You stated that you will go back to business as usual as soon as you can.  That's risky.  It's your attitude I was referring to.  Life is not about taking unusual risks.  It's about assessing the risks and taking cautious action.


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mrbowling300

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Reply with quote  #7 
Once stay at home is over with, I will be cautious as to places I will go to.  Life will be changed until a vaccination is developed.  I will not be in a hurry to go to a movie, out to a restaurant, unless it is take out, places with large gatherings of people, like concerts, baseball games, etc.  Sadly, bowling is still to be determined.  If the bowling center does not have a good plan, then maybe I'll take a year off from league, and just practice on my own.  I think it is too early to really know right now how life will be 1 month from now, so the best I can do is take it day by day.
TCJ

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldbowler


You stated that you will go back to business as usual as soon as you can.  That's risky.  It's your attitude I was referring to.  Life is not about taking unusual risks.  It's about assessing the risks and taking cautious action.



No, it isn't. Also, please don't intentionally misconstrue my words. I never said that life is about purposely taking unusual risks. Stop twisting words to your own purpose.

Based upon the information that I'm seeing (from many different sources, not just one or two, and not from the same ideology) I do not believe that it is much of a risk to resume life. This is not equivalent of throwing caution to the wind, closing ones eyes, and crossing a freeway. It is more like looking both directions and crossing a busy intersection at a crosswalk.

Also, to add a little information: life as usual for me is not nearly as risky as other people. About the only time I associate with large groups of people would be bowling league (very small league), church (and I don't stay to talk), and work (school). I don't go to games, I don't go shopping all the time, I don't care to attend concerts or parties. I already have a very low-risk life as far as passing a virus goes.

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Highs: Series (Sanc.): 794 | Game (Sanc.): 290/257 (LH) | Game (Unsanc.): 300 | Game Sport: 263 Averages: High (RH): 211 | High (LH): 175 | Sport: 166 (56) | Shark(8): 149 | Scorpion(8): 184 | Chameleon(12): 170 | Viper(12): 169 | Cheetah(12): 160 | US Open(3): 175 ___________________________
Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowling300
Once stay at home is over with, I will be cautious as to places I will go to.  Life will be changed until a vaccination is developed.  I will not be in a hurry to go to a movie, out to a restaurant, unless it is take out, places with large gatherings of people, like concerts, baseball games, etc.  Sadly, bowling is still to be determined.  If the bowling center does not have a good plan, then maybe I'll take a year off from league, and just practice on my own.  I think it is too early to really know right now how life will be 1 month from now, so the best I can do is take it day by day.


My thoughts too.  Unnecessary risks are just that.  Unnecessary.

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mrbowling300

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Reply with quote  #10 
It is interesting to note that in Sweden, they have not locked down, and they have not closed down their economy.  Their approach has been to operate as normal, let the virus spread around so that people get immune to it.  Have the elder population stay at home.  So far, the percent of deaths to the total country population has been about the same percentage of in the USA, who is locking down, etc.  They have their economy, we do not.  Fundamentally, which is the better course of action?  I'm far from an expert on that, and offer no opinion other than listening to a news report from last night.  


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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowling300
It is interesting to note that in Sweden, they have not locked down, and they have not closed down their economy.  Their approach has been to operate as normal, let the virus spread around so that people get immune to it.  Have the elder population stay at home.  So far, the percent of deaths to the total country population has been about the same percentage of in the USA, who is locking down, etc.  They have their economy, we do not.  Fundamentally, which is the better course of action?  I'm far from an expert on that, and offer no opinion other than listening to a news report from last night.  





Maybe they didn't have as many people bringing it
in the country as other countries did. Maybe it's not
as bad as it was originally touted. But why take a chance.



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mrbowling300

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Reply with quote  #12 
At Detroit Metro Airport, we have direct flights everyday that were going all over Asia and Europe.  There were a lot of people going through this area, interacting with residents, etc.  At major other US cities, the same occurred.  I'm sure that scenario doesn't exist as much in Sweden.  It would make sense to me that as a result, the exponential growth potential of Covid-19 in the US is a lot greater than in Sweden.  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowling300
At Detroit Metro Airport, we have direct flights everyday that were going all over Asia and Europe.  There were a lot of people going through this area, interacting with residents, etc.  At major other US cities, the same occurred.  I'm sure that scenario doesn't exist as much in Sweden.  It would make sense to me that as a result, the exponential growth potential of Covid-19 in the US is a lot greater than in Sweden.  



and we have a major UPS hub here.

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