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HeyItsMe

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Reply with quote  #1 
Plan to soak by balls (bowling) in hot water tonight. Stuff and tape up finger/thumb holes for extra precaution. Fill up bucket with tap water and let it soak. Put in some dish soap as well. Maybe do this 4-5 times.

Should I resurface ball after this?
BowlingOldies

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Reply with quote  #2 

Some bowling ball manufacturers recommend this method to clean ("de-oil") their bowling balls.  Storm/RotoGrip does.  (I've spoken to them about it.)  But some manufacturers are adamant about you NOT soaking their bowling balls in hot water, saying it can damage the core.  Brunswick is one such company that strongly recommends using DRY heat to de-oil their bowling balls, and says that soaking them in water very likely could damage the core.  I was about to do this with a friend's Brunswick bowling balls, but decided to call Brunswick first, and their main guy in the bowling ball division told me not to soak them.  (He also agreed that because of the different methods of manufacturing used by the two companies that soaking Storm/Roto balls was the best way with their stuff, but definitely NOT with Brunswick/DV8 equipment.)

So I would caution you to check with your bowling ball manufacturer before you soak your bowling balls to clean ("de-oil") them.

Now, here's the procedure that Storm told me to use:

1.  First, it's important to take the surface down to 360 or 500 grit BEFORE soaking.  That way you open up the pores of the bowling ball at the surface so the oil can easily escape in the hot, soapy water.

2.  Once the surface grit has been taken down, fill a bucket with hot tap water (about as hot as most taps will allow) and as the water is filling up the bucket, pour in a little Dawn dish soap, just enough to get a good sudsy mix.  (Dawn is the brand commonly used to remove oil from birds that get stuck in an ocean oil spill.  It's ideal for this use.)  WARNING:  Before you put your bowling ball in the water, make sure you remove any tape from inside your thumb hole or any other holes where you might use tape or cork of any kind.  Any tape left in the hole is subject to some melting of the glue by the hot water and can leave a sticky residue behind that can be hell to remove.  (No need to prep your inserts in your finger holes.  They'll be fine.  However, I've never performed this procedure on a ball that has Switch Grips or Interchangeable Thumb inserts.  If you have them installed in your bowling balls, check with the manufacturer of those items before you perform this cleaning method.)  Once you've thoroughly prepped the ball and been satisfied that everything is ready to go, just put the ball into the bucket of hot, soapy water and leave it in the water no longer than about 20 minutes, tops.  The water should fill the bucket enough to completely submerge the ball in water and suds.

3.  After about twenty minutes soaking in the hot, soapy water, remove the bowling ball from the bucket and rinse it off to get all the residue of soap off the ball and out of the holes.  I like to use a wash rag and scrub the surface a little before I completely discard the water in the bucket.  By the way, taping up the holes beforehand with duct tape won't be much use.  The hot, soapy water will, in all likelihood, just soak through the tape and the glue and the water is going to get into the holes regardless of what you do.  So I don't bother with the duct tape.  The first time I did this, I used duct tape and it came un-glued, but left behind a sticky residue on the ball from the glue.  So there's really no point in even bothering.  Storm assured me that on their equipment, the water in the holes won't do any damage as long as you don't leave the ball in the water for too long.  I've gone as long as about 30 minutes when I hadn't cleaned the balls in a long while.

4.  Dry the ball completely with a towel.  As far as any moisture inside the holes, I've always used a dry wash rag and rolled it up tight to get it into the hole to dab up as much moisture as possible.  I've even gone to the length to use a blow dryer (for hair) and blown hot air into the holes for a few minutes.  The main thing is to get all the excess moisture out.  The rest will air dry.  Just don't do this too close to when you need to go bowl, especially if you typically use tape in your thumb hole as the holes may take a little while to dry and whatever tape you like to use in your thumb hole may not want to stick if the holes are still damp.

5.  Put the ball on a ball spinner to bring the surface back up to wherever you want it.

According to Storm, one of the mistakes people often make is to soak the ball without first taking the surface down to 360 or 500.  Failing to do so before soaking can leave the pores clogged so that the oil can't escape, which basically defeats the whole purpose of doing the soaking in the first place.

Again, I encourage you to check with your ball's manufacturer before you use the hot, soapy water method.

Hope that helps.

HeyItsMe

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Reply with quote  #3 
Yeah I don't have abralon pads to sand it down to 360 grit
Fordman

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Reply with quote  #4 
Wow is it ever cold here maybe I should try soaking...
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Fordman

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Reply with quote  #5 
Don't forget to take them out of the water.  I left one over night and it faded and looked pink rather than red.
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TheBigCat

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordman
Don't forget to take them out of the water.  I left one over night and it faded and looked pink rather than red.

Remind me never to ask you to help with the laundry, Dennis.

Fred Bauss, in his pro shop, in the winter, just puts bowling balls in front of the air vent from the heater, and wipes the oil that seeps out off whenever he has a spare minute.

I stick mine about a foot or two from a space heater, and wipe and rotate them every 5-10 minutes until oil stops coming out.

Kurt Pilon, in his shop, used to put them near the light bulb next to his drill press and wipe the oil off when he saw some on the ball, and rotated the ball until it didn't bleed oil anymore.

A long time ago Bill Tucker (might have been Bill Srock or Bob Hart...I used to almost live in their pro shops, so I don't remember...but I think it was Tucker) had a rectangular cardboard box that was used to ship two bowling balls standing upright with a light bulb dangling into it, and the balls sitting in the bottom. He asked me to wipe the ball off for him, while he was out giving a lesson, and rotate the ball around until it was done. I asked him how I knew when it was done. He laughed at me and said 'When no more oil comes out'.
Dare

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Reply with quote  #7 
Last time I tried the bucket method I filled the bucket with hot water put my ball
in a plastic bag then put in bucket,came back a half hour later and the bucketwas
empty...make sure your bucketdoesn;t have a hole in it.


I now stick my in a oven on warm with the door open...so far no cracked balls

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Fordman

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Reply with quote  #8 
Randy's pro shop buddy Andy has a machine that soaks and vibrates your balls...  [biggrin]
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Dare

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordman
Randy's pro shop buddy Andy has a machine that soaks and vibrates your balls...  [biggrin]


So does the local massage parlor here.

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TheBigCat

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dare
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordman
Randy's pro shop buddy Andy has a machine that soaks and vibrates your balls...  [biggrin]


So does the local massage parlor here.

Outstanding!!!!!!!!
BowlingOldies

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Reply with quote  #11 

I've seen two types of these things before.  The one you see pictured here is one my ball driller uses.  It's essentially a small oven and de-oils bowling balls through the use of hot air.  I've also seen one that looks exactly like the one you see here, but instead of it using hot air, you fill it with hot soapy water and soak your bowling balls in it.  I'm not sure, but the same company may make both models.  Just a plastic bucket with a lid that has what appears to be a thermostat that plugs in to the wall (at least I'm assuming that's what the knob is).  Personally, I've never used either one.  But if my pro uses one, I would assume they work just fine.  I priced this one once, and if memory serves, it runs about the same as a ball spinner.  Probably an investment worth making if you are serious about your game and don't feel like going with the bucket-in-the-bath-tub method.

[BallRevivor] 

HeyItsMe

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Reply with quote  #12 
I actually do use a NuWave oven over a bucket with a thermometer prong to adjust temperature. It really doesn't seem to get much oil out. I am fairly conservative with the temperature as I don't let it get above 125 or so.
BowlingOldies

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Reply with quote  #13 

The key to the hot water method is taking the surface down first.  If you don't, and if the pores are clogged with oil, all you do is clean the outer surface and never quite get anything to come out through the clogged pores.

You've gotta "exfoliate" first.  Use an abralon pad and a ball spinner to take the surface down to 360 (if it's a low surface ball to begin with) or 500 (if it's a higher surface ball normally), and THEN soak it.  The pores will be opened up and the oil can then more easily escape in the hot, soapy water.

I also use a wash rag before I completely remove the ball from the bucket and give it a good scrubbing before pouring the soapy water out.

LEN84

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Reply with quote  #14 
GREAT info     my son just got me a nuball bowling deoiler for xmas and the instructions say 125 degrees for 1 hr at a time. I've been combing the internet looking for other bowlers cleaning habits
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