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pbateson

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Reply with quote  #1 
Have you ever use on your bowling balls or neither use?
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Khun Paul
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Reply with quote  #2 

I use 'em all the time.  Here's what I get:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/BOWLING-ACCESSORIES-6-abralon-pads-360-500-1-2-3-4000-grits-U-PICK-EM-/201276393756?hash=item2edd02091c:m:mxszdZjU3dPsvigCcZgbF2g

Purchasing a ball spinner was the best investment I ever made in my game.  Allows me to keep the covers on my bowling balls fresh and maintain the like-new performance.  Gotta have abralon pads to maintain your bowling balls.  Or to modify the surface, should that be your preference.

themrfreeze

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Reply with quote  #3 
I also use a ball spinner to restore the surface on my gear (mostly urethane).  Used to buy Abralon pads, but they're pretty pricey.  I just buy contour sanding pads from the lumber yard where I get lumber for my woodworking projects. 

One of the "downsides" to Abralon pads is the uniformity of the abrasives they use.  If you're looking to get a ball truly dull, you're better off using a cheap sanding pad or even plain wet-and-dry sandpaper, where the variable size of the abrasives leads to a more "chaotic" scratch pattern.   As I usually put a dull(ish) surface on most of my gear, that's what I use.  If you want to get a ball shined up,  the uniformity of Abralons becomes a positive, and those work best.



RoadRunner

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Reply with quote  #4 
I also have a spinner, and consider it an essential part of my arsenal. Some people love to experiment with layout; but that's expensive and doesn't result in big reaction difference. I have two bread and butter layouts I use on almost everything, but with my spinner, I can tweak surfaces continuously until I find exactly what I'm looking for.  

I use abralon pads, but am going to do some experimenting when I run out of the pile I currently have. Like MrFreeze said, they're expensive, and they wear out very quickly. Most of my equipment ends up at 2000 grit, and a 2000 pad quickly starts to feel like a 4000 pad. For what you pay to get them, they don't last long enough.

But, paying too much is way better than not having them at all.
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