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Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #1 
Between the changes in lane conditions where I bowl, the number of entry level bowlers and the equipment they use, and my old hands, I decided to get a lower performance ball and get a totally new layout.  I went to a shop where the owner is a high level machinist, who owns two shops, and works there part time.  He set me up with right lateral pitch in the thumb and increased my finger pitch away from my palm, and most importantly did a custom oval thumb. I also had him set it up pin down just to see how that works.  Every other ball I own is pin up.  I am hoping that will allow me to bowl a tighter line, not have the ball dragging off my thumb, and lessen the ache in my hand by the time I am done bowling 3 games.

The lanes I bowl at seem to not have any dry to the outside, and where I sub is wall to wall oil.  My previous delivery depended on a bank shot off the dry, or  I had to use my plastic spare ball and try to throw a rocket to the pocket.  The new ball is a red, white and blue Brunswick Twist in 14 lbs, down from the 14lb 10, 11, or 12 oz balls I have been using.  I will find out Monday whether or not that works.

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Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #2 
The good news is the layout worked really well.  I averaged 228 for 3 games.  The bad news is now I want another new ball to try it out with.  I own a bunch of balls, but I don't think trying to plug and re-drill all the holes to a new layout is the best plan.  I know disturbing the balance of the ball and then plugging it doesn't help any, but plugging it and trying out new angles in thumb and fingers can't be the smartest approach.

Any thoughts on plugging and re-drilling for a new layout?  You folks know better than I do how that stuff works.

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themrfreeze

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Reply with quote  #3 
If the ball in question is a single-drill and hasn't been plugged/redrilled before, then go ahead and get it redone.  I have several balls that were plugged/redrilled and they're all perfectly fine.  It's when you get into multiple pluggings/redrilling that things get sketchy.



Oldbowler

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Quote:
Originally Posted by themrfreeze
If the ball in question is a single-drill and hasn't been plugged/redrilled before, then go ahead and get it redone.  I have several balls that were plugged/redrilled and they're all perfectly fine.  It's when you get into multiple pluggings/redrilling that things get sketchy.





If I am changing pitches in the fingers, then to plug and re drill means going through the plug at an angle that will take me from the plug into the original ball structure.  Doesn't that pose a risk of the plug weakening or disintegrating with drilling?

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Dare

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Reply with quote  #5 
Here plugging and re drilling a ball is about 55 bucks. Strike and Spares on Fern Valley.
One of Wolfe's shops.

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bowlersensi

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldbowler


If I am changing pitches in the fingers, then to plug and re drill means going through the plug at an angle that will take me from the plug into the original ball structure. 


A while back there was a article in Bowling This Month called "The Effect of Plugging and Redrilling on Bowling Ball Mass Properties by "Bill Sempsrott" (he developed the Powerhouse Blueprint ball motion simulator software) where he simulated drilling and plugging and re-drilling balls.

The finding was essentially as far as the mass properties of the ball are concerned there's not enough difference to matter to the on-lane ball motion, So go ahead and plug one and try out your new layout.

Quote:
Doesn't that pose a risk of the plug weakening or disintegrating with drilling?


Not unless the plugs were poorly done in the first place.


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Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowlersensi


A while back there was a article in Bowling This Month called "The Effect of Plugging and Redrilling on Bowling Ball Mass Properties by "Bill Sempsrott" (he developed the Powerhouse Blueprint ball motion simulator software) where he simulated drilling and plugging and re-drilling balls.

The finding was essentially as far as the mass properties of the ball are concerned there's not enough difference to matter to the on-lane ball motion, So go ahead and plug one and try out your new layout.



Not unless the plugs were poorly done in the first place.



Thanks for the info.  I knew you folks know a lot more than I do.  I've only been back into bowling 5 years and so much has changed I have a hard time digesting it all.

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Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #8 
I really liked one of the balls I was using, a Brunswick Cutting Edge at 14 lb 12 oz, but decided to not try getting that one re done to the new layout.  I found a Cutting Edge Pearl new in 14-3 for $84.95 with free shipping at Bowler's Mart so I ordered one.  I am trying to keep my chicken wing under control and play a much tighter line to the pocket, and the Cutting Edge should give me some leeway when the lanes start to dry up.  I don't like bowling on the fresh and have always said we should throw out the first two games of a series and use the 3rd, 4th, and 5th games total, but no one agrees with me.
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