Bowling Forums, Bowling Discussion and Bowling Talk
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
mrbowling300

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 11,770
Reply with quote  #1 

This is the very last day before the Michigan no smoking law goes into effect.  I can't wait to enter a bowling establishment and actually be able to breathe.  I told the manager of where I bowl that I hope they are able to air the place out over the summer.  They almost have to put in new ceiling tiles, carpet and paint the walls.  I don't know how else you can 40+ years of stink out.

mrbowling300

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 11,770
Reply with quote  #2 
Here is an article in today's Detroit News that speaks about Garden Bowl, one of the two bowling centers left within the city limits of Detroit.  It's in the Wayne St. University area, and I believe, is the oldest center in Michigan.

Smoke-free era to begin in Michigan

FRANCIS X. DONNELLY
The Detroit News

At the Garden Bowl, bowlers have smoked since the first gutter ball in 1913.

Bowling and smoking are so intertwined that a player is as likely to be clutching a cigarette in one hand as a bowling ball in the other.

Until Saturday.

For the first time in 97 years, the Detroit bowling alley will be smoke-free. And so will most other public places in Michigan as the state institutes a smoking ban in 17,000 bars, restaurants and other establishments.

"We're part of the last century," said Joe Zainea, whose family owns the business, one of the oldest bowling alleys in the country. "The new century says smoking is out."

With cigarettes already vanquished from most pop culture and workplaces, the statewide edict contributes to the passing of an era, say culture experts. Smoking has been part of the country's social fabric for nearly a century.

People lit up with their morning coffee, while having a beer or after dinner. Cigarettes were omnipresent at various haunts: bars, bingo halls, VFW posts, pool halls, private clubs.

Its erasure from culture is even retroactive, say social observers.

The U.S. Post Office, before placing painter Jackson Pollock and musician Robert Johnson onto stamps, digitally removed cigarettes from their mouths.

"It's OK to discriminate against us," said Cathy Fenwick, 47, who was eating lunch at Smokies Restaurant and Lounge in Wyandotte. "People want to drive us away."

On the eve of the ban this week, the owners of Metro Detroit's smokiest provinces fretted about the future.

Phil Brigandi, who manages four bars in Detroit and the suburbs, said customers have told him that they're going to start drinking at home.

"In these economic times, this is the worst thing that can happen to me," he said.

Impact seen as low

Other states and cities that have snuffed out public smoking said businesses were hurt at first but bounced back. Michigan, where 21 percent of adults still smoke, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, is the 39th state to ban smoking

In New York City, some bars and restaurants lost a quarter of sales during the first few months after a ban was imposed in 2003, according to the New York State Restaurant Association.

But customers eventually returned and the retailers haven't been affected by the law.

At Hall of Fame Billiards in Warren, manager Rudy Toma hopes the ban will draw new customers. That is, people who have avoided the pool hall in the past will now venture into the smoke-free environs.

"We'll see a lot of people we've never seen before," he said.

Old habits die hard

Among those raging against the dying of the light are the dwindling members of VFW Post 7546 in Dearborn Heights.

Few members are younger than 55. One is 94. The post was formed in 1946.

Their meeting place is a windowless, concrete bunker of a building half a block from St. Hedwig Cemetery.

"They're not worried about smoking," said Greg Belback, lounge manager. "They feel like they don't have long to live anyway."

Members believe that, as long as cigarettes are legal, people should be able to smoke them anywhere.

The next thing you know, one said, government will try to impose a two-beer limit on people.

One joked he might switch to marijuana because it's becoming more acceptable than cigarettes.

"I need it for medical reasons," said Ron McKenzie, 59, of Dearborn.

Ban hits across strata

The working class isn't the only group affected by the smoking ban.

So are the longtime smoking bastions of the hoity-toity.

The white linen tablecloths of the Grosse Ile Yacht Club will be safe from cigarette ash Saturday.

Smoking was a sore point at the 75-year-old club long before the state ban, members said.

Three years ago, smokers were exiled to a second bar upstairs, said Kathy Walker, the club's finance chairwoman.

Walker welcomed the state law because it meant club leaders wouldn't have to decide on their own whether to impose a ban.

"It takes the sting out of it," she said. "No ifs, ands or buts, we have to do it."

She worried that some members may spend less time at the club and more at cigar bars, where smoking will remain legal. Also exempted from the ban are tobacco shops and the gaming floors of the casinos in Detroit.

Walker said the three-year banishment of smokers wasn't that bad because the upstairs lounge had TVs, was fully stocked and, on a clear day, offered a view all the way across Lake Erie to Ohio.

She meant it as a good thing.

Workers' health a bonus

Joe Zainea isn't worried about the smoking ban hurting his family business, Garden Bowl.

He's more concerned about the health of workers. Along those lines, he's ecstatic about the smoking ban.

"Did you ever bowl next to a smoker?" he asked with a chuckle. "It's horrible."

Zainea, 76, is the voice of experience.

He has worked at Garden Bowl since his dad, Al, bought it in 1946.

He breathed in so much second-hand smoke that he lost part of a lung in 1972.

"What is the value of smoking?" he asked. "I don't know why people do it. If they want to get high, they should drink. If they want to get dizzy in the head, they should smoke a little marijuana."

Still, he allowed smoking because customers wanted it.

It remained through the decades as customers changed from Polish to southern transplants to Asians to blacks to hipsters.

It remained as ownership passed through three generations of his family.

The checkerboard ceiling was so stained by smoke it had to be repainted every year, Zainea said.

On Saturday, the family can put the paintbrushes away.

fdonnelly@detnews.com">fdonnelly@detnews.com (313) 223-4186

Additional Facts
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,665
Reply with quote  #3 

bowlingfan8

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,606
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowling300

This is the very last day before the Michigan no smoking law goes into effect.  I can't wait to enter a bowling establishment and actually be able to breathe.  I told the manager of where I bowl that I hope they are able to air the place out over the summer.  They almost have to put in new ceiling tiles, carpet and paint the walls.  I don't know how else you can 40+ years of stink out.




Congrats! Our bowling alley did no kind of airing out, all the old 60s ceiling tiles are still there!

__________________


http://www.youtube.com/bowlingfan33
Fordman

Registered:
Posts: 3,567
Reply with quote  #5 

Every year our center moved them down to the pin area.  Over the counter and main isle way was replaced every year.  It was a 5 year cycle.  The owner is giddy with the new law. 


__________________
Shake a Vets hand you owe them.
Dearborn Mi. Home town of Henry Ford
mrbowling300

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 11,770
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordman

Every year our center moved them down to the pin area.  Over the counter and main isle way was replaced every year.  It was a 5 year cycle.  The owner is giddy with the new law. 

Our owner is expecting the worst.  He feels that there will be a drop off in business for him.  Meanwhile, our league is picking up 4 new teams next year.  I have no idea if this is due to no smoking, but it's a positive sign, none the less.

Fordman

Registered:
Posts: 3,567
Reply with quote  #7 
What I can't understand is the cigar smokers who complain.  They complain the loudest.  They don't even inhale.  They aren't addicted.   

__________________
Shake a Vets hand you owe them.
Dearborn Mi. Home town of Henry Ford
themrfreeze

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 3,870
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowling300

They almost have to put in new ceiling tiles, carpet and paint the walls.  I don't know how else you can 40+ years of stink out.



Once that stench sinks into something, you can't get it out. You either have to replace everything with new, or coat everything with shellac to seal it in.

hailmaizeandblue

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,784
Reply with quote  #9 
i'm not a businessman, however I do know that business owners always have to adapt to variable changes in the economy..

smoking is no different..if you're bowling on a competitive league so you can smoke, then there must be something strange going on..just my opinion.

we are leaving our current men's league, but they too are picking up 4 teams..its amazing! i really do believe that this is a direct effect of the ban!

btw, i wont dare post this on the PBA Forums, just because of how it'll get ripped apart! also..bowling a tournament that claims to be "prestigious" will feel more like a pro event because of the no-smoking policy!
websurferdude

Registered:
Posts: 581
Reply with quote  #10 
!
websurferdude

Registered:
Posts: 581
Reply with quote  #11 
http://www.sourcenewspapers.com/articles/2010/05/17/news/doc4bf1a65921cd2103748552.txt

Bars see increase in business since smoking ban

It’s been only weeks since Michiganians were forced to extinguish nearly every form of indoor smoking - and surprising to many, business at many local bars has already increased.

For years, as the Michigan legislature talked about the smoking ban, many bar owners quietly worried that doing so would kill their business – even though they were concerned about secondhand smoke risks for their employees and themselves. The opinions of business owners were controversial. If they spoke against a ban, they would offend their non-smoking clients. If they wanted clean air, their cigarette-loving patrons might grow angry.

But now that the law is the law, bar owners are speaking out.

Bobby Walker, the night manager at Snooker’s in Utica, said he’s had former smoking customers return to his bar, after disappearing years ago. Often when a smoking customer quits cigarettes, they tend to avoid places of temptation. Since the ban, a few faces have returned.

“It was nice to see,” Walker said. “Our business hasn’t changed and I don’t smoke so it doesn’t affect me. The biggest change is the air doesn’t smell. The smokers, so far, don’t seem to mind much going outside. But it hasn’t been too cold out.”

At Gator Jake’s in Sterling Heights, General Manager Mike Brooks said he noticed an immediate increase in patronage at the restaurant that’s been in business for more than a decade.

“The very next day we had more families coming in,” Brooks said. “When you have kids, you might avoid places if you think it’s going to be smoky. People were making (positive) comments instantly.”

Brooks said the vibe at Gator Jake’s has changed a little bit in that he and his employees go outside at least once an hour to clean up cigarette butts, but that doesn’t matter much to him.

“It’s been smooth. A few people complained, but that’s expected. There’s a couple people who left, but they will be back because they’ll get bored sitting at home,” he laughed. “We will be here when they do.”

Khalil Sardy, a Sterling Heights resident, sees friends going out more.

“Everyone was afraid that the bar/club business will go down. From observation, I see an increase. The people who were not going out due to smoking and their clothes smelling are returning,” Sardy said. “The first time I went out after the no-smoking law went into effect, I had a much better experience: no smoke hue, no smoke smell and best of all, when I returned home I didn't need to put my clothes in the garage for the next three days.”

At Roger’s Roost, also in Sterling Heights, the business has slightly increased and seating for clients has become easier, said manager Scott Nowicki. “When you have a senior citizen coming in with an oxygen tank, they cannot be anywhere near smoke. So it’s easier to sit everyone. We haven’t had a single incident.”

Nowicki said on the first day of the ban, one smoker lit up on the patio.

“And when we told him smoking isn’t permitted there, by state law, he apologized and put it out. Everyone’s working together on this.”

For some, going outside to smoke is reducing how much nicotine they’re inhaling. Customers not wanting to miss the action inside of bars are stepping outside for quick “half cigarette” breaks. Others are seeing that the smoking section outside is actually becoming as much of a scene as the action inside.

“We come out here to smoke and talk about whoever we want who’s inside,” laughed May Donovan of Sterling Heights while smoking a Virginia Slim cigarette near Sterling Lanes last weekend.

“It’s not bad now, but during the winter, I hope everyone’s planning to get heat lamps,” added her sister-in-law Kerri Dunlap. “There’s people much more mad than me. There’s Facebook groups just for people who want their rights back. I should be able to at least sit on the patio of a restaurant and have a smoke with my wine.”

Shelby Township resident Donna Freeman said the crowds outside the bars give the illusion the locale is ultra-hip.

"When you drive by a place with crowds outside, you think, 'Wow, that place must be packed.’ Then you realize it's the smokers. I'm sure I'll join them once in a while - if it's not raining. Nothing worse than smelling like smoke and getting wet at the same time."

Fordman

Registered:
Posts: 3,567
Reply with quote  #12 

I just started my 2nd go around of chemo the other was 2 years ago.  If the smoking ban gets anyone to quit it will be well worth it.  I am sure none of you would want to go through it. 


__________________
Shake a Vets hand you owe them.
Dearborn Mi. Home town of Henry Ford
mrbowling300

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 11,770
Reply with quote  #13 
What are you being treated for, if you don't mind me asking?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordman

I just started my 2nd go around of chemo the other was 2 years ago.  If the smoking ban gets anyone to quit it will be well worth it.  I am sure none of you would want to go through it. 

Fordman

Registered:
Posts: 3,567
Reply with quote  #14 

I had colon cancer a few years ago.  They took out about 5-6 inches and every thing was OK with that.  Missed 3 weeks of bowling.  at the time the found a few spots on my lung from the colon and cut them out.  Missed a week.  There are some more tiny spots detected so getting them early.  Shouldn't miss any bowling.  Much easier than ducking bullets and wading through rice paddies. Oh yea bypass surgery isn't great either.  That was five weeks missed.   


__________________
Shake a Vets hand you owe them.
Dearborn Mi. Home town of Henry Ford
Pullmyfinger

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,665
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordman

I just started my 2nd go around of chemo the other was 2 years ago.  If the smoking ban gets anyone to quit it will be well worth it.  I am sure none of you would want to go through it. 


I feel for you. While my cancer was not smoking related, I'm elated with the new law.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.