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bowlingfan8

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I have a question for all of you. About every year my bowling alley gets the lanes re-surfaced about this time of year. For about 6-8 weeks afterwards I can't figure them out. Any suggestions?
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Rep

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Reply with quote  #2 
Pretty much just hang in there. After a resurface the lanes always get funky. Usually extra oil is applied to help protect the lanes while the coat is still fresh and they tend to hook a lot at the same time so they can get over/under pretty easily. Until they settle back in and get some play there's not much you can do really. Also with the lanes changing a lot as they settle in houses usually play around with the shot as well to try and compensate, sometimes it helps, sometimes it just makes it worse. One of our higher scoring houses in the area is still wood, and there's some good bowlers around here. Scores always drop drastically when they resurface, then pop back up once the coat gets some play. Just grind it out is my best advice

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Fordman

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Reply with quote  #3 

Heres a dumb question but do the synthetic lanes get resurfaced too.  Where I bowl they kept the wood approaches and I am sure glad they did.


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thiswilldo

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Reply with quote  #4 
If your wood lanes get resurfaced nearly every year, you are lucky. Most places can't afford the cost of the work or loss of revenue because of closing during the process to often. I have known alleys here to go 5 or 6 years before taking the plunge and paying out for the work. They just could not afford to do it more often.



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Mikhail

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Reply with quote  #5 
Rep hit the nail on the head. Take this food for thought, wood is a living object. In the process of resurfacing you take the coating of oil off and expose the now raw wood to the air. This drys the lane, once the oil is reapplied it takes time for the oil to enter the wood.

This is by far the strangest lane you will bowl on. You are bowling on a dry surface with a oil sheen.

As far as synthetic lanes go I'm sure they cleaned but not resurfaced. Resurfacing synthetic lanes would negate the purpose of them.

I'm no expert but these are my views.
Rep

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Reply with quote  #6 
It's still a semi-new concept but synthetics can be resurfaced. Of course it's not like wood lanes and would NEVER be done anywhere near as often. It's mainly done to older synthetic lanes to get the track area off of them. I personally don't know of any houses that do it myself. We have 25+ year old synthetics where I work and bowl and they still score VERY well, never resurfaced

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themrfreeze

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhail
Rep hit the nail on the head. Take this food for thought, wood is a living object. In the process of resurfacing you take the coating of oil off and expose the now raw wood to the air. This drys the lane, once the oil is reapplied it takes time for the oil to enter the wood.


Given that woodworking is one of my hobbies, I can provide a little insight into this.

All wood lanes have a film-forming surface applied to them.  In the old days, it was lacquer.  Now, it's a polyurethane.  These finishes seal the wood...the oil applied to the lane surface does NOT make contact with the wood unless that film finish is broken. 

For *raw* wood to be exposed to the air, the entire finish must be removed, including the entire thickness of the wood that the finish was able to penetrate.  This would be a question for the guys over at Bowltech, but I suspect that they don't abrade the surface to that extent.  They probably sand just enough to get the top film off and make everything level as possible, then recoat as soon as possible. 

Old wood tends to ABSORB moisture, not release it.  A wood lane has hundreds of different boards in it, some maple, some pine.  Each board has its own density, and as such, will absorb differing amount of moisture, causing them to swell differing amounts.  I bet if you completely stripped an old lane in the middle of summer (when this kind of work tends to be done), and left it exposed in humid weather for a few days, the surface would change so much that no two adjacent board would be even with each other.



Rep

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Reply with quote  #8 
They take VERY little off, even when they actually do a cut and recoat they don't take a lot off. I forget the exact measurement but it was somewhere around 1/8" when the lanes are actually cut and not just recoated

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Pullmyfinger

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Reply with quote  #9 

Most places will only resurface every other year if needed. The year(s) in between only get a light screening. The worst part for me was dealing with the slick approaches.

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