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hprelude

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello, I am 17 years old and recently started bowling. Once I started I got hooked and couldnt stop haha. Ive been bowling for only 1 month now, probably about once or twice a week and I started with a 90 average, and now im at a 150 average. I started out with a one hand , and no thumb technique and I still do it, its hard for me to do with thumb in and I just love hooking the ball no thumb. I have done research and know that Its hard to be consistent with the no thumb one hand technique so tomorrow I am going to start practicing with the two hander no thumb technique like belmo or osku. Any tips on that? I am one that gets frustrated when I cant learn something right away. Hopefully it isnt too difficult. Anyways I was wondering if I should wait to get better to join a league. My avg is 150 and best game was 190. I am also looking into buying a ebonite cyclone bowling ball. Thank you!!!!!!!
BowlingOldies

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Reply with quote  #2 

A 150 average is plenty good enough to bowl in a league.  There are plenty of people who bowl league who average less than that.

But what I'm interested in is your statement that "it's hard for me to do with thumb in..." and "I just love hooking the ball no thumb."

Get your hand measured and have a ball drilled for your hand, learn the proper technique so it won't be hard for you "to do with thumb in."

What's with this obsession to "hook the ball?"  The object of the game is not to see how much you can hook the ball.  The object of the game is to knock down the most pins possible.  To do that, control is key.  If you don't know where the ball is going, all the hook in the world isn't going to help you.  Besides, when your average is 150 (or for that matter, when it's 200) SPARES are as important as strikes, and you most certainly don't need to hook the ball (in fact, in most cases, you really don't want to hook the ball) in order to convert spares.

Methinks before you seriously consider joining a league, a recalibration of your thought process about the game is in order.

In summary:

* A ball that fits will allow you to put your thumb in and throw it more effectively.
* "Hooking it" isn't the objective; knocking down pins is.
* Accuracy is, has always been, and will always be, 90 percent of the game.
* Straighter is greater.
* Improved sparemaking will more quickly raise your average than any attempt to "hook the ball" ever will.

TCJ

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Reply with quote  #3 
I am a two-hander and perhaps could give some very general pointers on it, but it's not an easy thing to do over the internet, particularly because what works for one person doesn't work for another.   BowlingOldies is absolutely right about not trying to hook the ball as much as possible.   When I began two-handed bowling it was because my weak low-revs ball was skidding way too much on sport patterns.  I adopted a new style so I could get a backend reaction.   The result of this was that when I bowled on the typical house shot I'd hook the entire lane and it was harder to control.   Sure, it was fun, but it wasn't making me better.   I only got much better at it when I found a way to throw two-handed while DECREASING my hook.   I can still curve the ball across the lane if I want to (or need to), but I much prefer the straighter shot now.   I also use a plastic ball for spare shots so it won't hook much even with the added revs.   Sometimes I just shoot them with one hand.   Osku does.   If that's the case for you then you'd definitely want to learn to bowl with your thumb in for spares even if you throw two-handed (or just thumbless) on your strike shot.

If you're really serious about bowling two-handed then do a few things:

1.  Make sure the ball you get is drilled legal for two-handed.   There are different rules for drilling based on whether you bowl thumbless or not.  Stupid, I know, but they're there.   If you join a sanctioned league your equipment has to be legal, so might as well start on the right foot.

2.  Watch, watch, watch videos of the two-handed pros.  There are certainly a lot of differences in throwing that way as opposed to the traditional style, but the basics are still there as well.  Don't forget about those in an effort to just look cool because you won't look cool.  You'll just be a bad bowler!

3.  NEVER lift up with your back to try to get extra revs.  The extra revs aren't worth a bad back a little later in life. 

__________________
Highs: Series (Sanc.): 794 | Game (Sanc.): 290/257 (LH) | Game (Unsanc.): 300 | Game Sport: 263 Averages: High (RH): 211 | High (LH): 175 | Sport: 166 (56) | Shark(8): 149 | Scorpion(8): 184 | Chameleon(12): 170 | Viper(12): 169 | Cheetah(12): 160 | US Open(3): 175 ___________________________
Buckeye_Nut

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Reply with quote  #4 
I agree with bowling oldies.  My recommendation is to get a ball fingertip drilled by a professional and learn to throw the ball with 1 hand.   The 2 hand style isn't for everybody, and most bowlers that I see trying 2-handed  can't make a spare to save their life.  They do hook the ball like crazy, but with no control.   Knocking down corner pins single pin leaves is hard enough and trying this 2 handed will only make it more difficult.  
hprelude

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you guys for the responses. Well I did what I said and I tried bowling two handed today. It was terrible, it didnt feel right for me and I bowled two games and got an 80 and 95, that was very disappointing. I think I will go back to my one hand no thumb technique because It feels better and I do better. My last question is, I am going to get a bowling ball drilled for my hand with fingertip grip I guess, so do you think once I get my ball, I should try to bowl with thumb in? Because ive only been using house balls, so maybe that is why I cant bowl thumb in to save my life. I think my biggest fear is that even with my own ball I wont be able to bowl with thumb in, so I would have to stick with thumb out one hand. Thank you for the responses!!!
Buckeye_Nut

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Reply with quote  #6 
Using a plastic house ball with fingers buried to the 2nd knuckle, nobody can do any "real bowling" with that equipment.  I probably wouldn't do any better with a plastic ball and a conventional grip!!!    Fingertip drilling is a must to impart proper rotation.............step 2.....a modern reactive ball.  Real bowling doesn't begin until you have the proper equipment......   

Good luck!

Buckeye_Nut

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Reply with quote  #7 
PS...you definitely need to join a youth league!  
BowlingOldies

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Reply with quote  #8 

Absolutely get a fingertip grip.  Specifically, tell your ball driller you want a RELAXED FINGERTIP grip (as opposed to a stretched one).  Relaxed fingertip is what most ball drillers go with by default.  But you don't want a stretched grip.  A stretched fingertip grip means the webbing in your hand between your index finger and your thumb is stretched out a bit, making the grip tighter, requiring that you bevel the front of the thumbhole a bit to clear the thumb easily.  That's no good, as it means the ball will feel like it's slipping out of your hand as you swing it, prompting you to squeeze it to hold on.  You don't want to squeeze it.  You want your thumb super relaxed.  The ball should hold on to you, not the other way around.  A relaxed fingertip grip leaves that webbing between your thumb and index finger far less stretched and the span between your fingers and thumb slightly shorter so  you don't need all that bevel on the thumbhole to get your thumb out easily and quickly.  That's the key to a good release.

I believe that the reason why so many bowlers get frustrated and go to a thumbless delivery (or in some cases, have their ball drilled so that they only put their thumb in to the first knuckle) is because they have a bad experience with their original fitting; the ball driller gives them a span that is a little too long.  That will cause the thumb to hang in the ball.  There's nothing worse.  But it can be easily solved by simply shortening the span a little.

For me, I also found that left pitch on my thumbhole (I'm right-handed) allowed me to stay more behind the ball through release and get out cleanly.  But everybody's different.  (Forward/reverse pitch is determined mostly by the length of your span, and any competent ball driller will either have a chart handy or will know by heart how much forward/reverse pitch to give you based on the length of your span.)  The left/right pitch of the thumbhole is somewhat more discretionary, although even there, your ball driller should have you grip his wrist (or there's a cylindrical tool they use to have you grip) to see where your thumb naturally wants to go relative to left/right pitch.

The proper span looks like this:  With your thumb in the ball and your middle and ring fingers laying on top of the finger holes, stretched out slightly but not too taut, the first crease in those fingers should occur about 40 to 50 percent of the way up from the bottom edge of the finger holes to the top edge.  If that crease is any closer to the bottom edge of the finger holes, the span is a little too long and your thumb will hang in the thumbhole unless you bevel the snot out of the edge of it, which you don't want to have to do.  And if that first crease in your fingers lays any closer to the top edge of the finger holes than that, the span is a little too short (unless you're deliberately going for a semi-fingertip fit).  (Note: A "conventional" grip is when you put your fingers in to the second crease.  I don't think anyone here would ever recommend a conventional grip to anyone other than small children who are first starting out or seniors who might have physical problems with their hands like arthritis and need the extra grip just to hold on.)

I can throw my stuff with no sanding at all on the thumbhole.  I don't recommend doing that, and I sand mine.  But only a little.  Enough to take the sharp edge off.  But not much more than that.  The worst thing of all is for the hole to feel bigger at the top than it is down inside.  I like the walls of the thumbhole to be nice and parallel, the same distance from each other at the top as they are at the bottom.  Then I know I can hang on effortlessly and it will fly off when I want it to.

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