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Brownswick

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Reply with quote  #1 

Just goes to show you, it's best to keep your expectations in check.

 

https://www.clickhole.com/price-of-hubris-this-kid-who-said-he-was-old-enough-to-1829425552?utm_campaign=SF&utm_content=Main&utm_medium=SocialMarketing&utm_source=Facebook


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Randy Brown
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Oldbowler

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Reply with quote  #2 
You mean he didn't get a participation trophy to soothe his mangled ego?  How rude!
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CObowler

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Reply with quote  #3 
Times were different 50 years ago, when I was about that age and size.

Back then, the bowling alley in my area had no bumpers.  You learned quickly the importance of having the right equipment to bowl without a safety net.  It would be no fun to keep rolling gutter balls over and over with a ball too heavy and a span too large or too small.   
                              
Fortunately, the desk clerk kept all the 7 and 8-pound house balls behind the counter and worked with kids to find a ball with the best fit and weight.  This was also the pencil-and-paper scoresheet era when the desk clerk would not start the meter until everyone - especially the youngest ones - had several practice frames.  Contrast that with the stingy corporate beancounters today, where any practice balls count toward your prepaid frame allotment.    

When going open bowling in the 1960s, we children were instructed to stay focused on proper bowling etiquette, yield to players on either side and keep our emotions under control.  We knew better than to have an emotional outburst in the bowling alley because there would be consequences at home later.

Perhaps the reason children like the one in the article behave so poorly in public is because they are constantly overstimulated by all the video games and other media.  They cannot concentrate on any one thing for very long and have not learned the value of working hard to overcome failure due to inexperience.  If nothing changes, these children will grow up to be the types who quit a job at the first word of criticism -- not unlike today's Millennials.
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